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To my lovely bro’s n sis’s out there!!!

Hi all!!!

Its Tinytoes again… After a very long time its time for my hearfelt wishes for my cute, lovable and sweet bro’s and sis’s out there in this whole world… 

Wishing you all a HAPPY RAKSHA BANDHAN!!!

Love you all guys!!! 

Though I have a very few brothers and sisters, I am so lucky in having you all and you sure are Gods gifts to me 🙂 Thanks for being with me 🙂 If I have hurt you or ignored you for some reason I ask for forgiveness as this might be the right time for asking and saying the unsaid things that matters much among relationships and I dont ever want to miss anyone of you all 🙂 Forgive me and do love me as now forever 🙂 🙂 🙂   

 

 

Raksha Bandhan is a term from the Hindi language which means a relationship or an association based on protection. This is a festival which has a long standing Indian heritage. More commonly known as Rakhi, this Indian festival signifies the sacred bond of love between a brother and sister.

The Changing Face of Raksha Bandhan
Rakhi, though considered by some as having a religious origin. But, there have been many occasions in history that have emphasized the relationship between a brother and a sister more than the religious side of it. Gradually, over the centuries and over time Rakhi has lost its original outlook that made everyone associate it with the Hindu religion.

Origin of Raksha Bandhan
As with other Indian festivals, Rakhi also follows the festival calender that is completely based on the weather changes and their significance in the lives of people. Rakhi has a rich Indian mythological base. Many historically significant epics are related to the origin and the subsequent development of Raksha Bandhan. The festival also finds a mention in most of the epics and its origin can be traced to as far back as the Pouranik times.

Legendary Stories of Raksha Bandhan

  • Alexander The Great and King Puru 
    Alexander, the great (as he was called) was on a mission to conquer the world. On his crusade through the Indian subcontinent somewhere around 300 B.C., King Alexander of Macedonia was shaken by the fury of the Indian king, Puru. It was then that Alexander’s wife, approached King Puru as a sister. On Alexander’s next attempt, King Puru, as a tribute to the sacred bond of Rakhi, did not oppose King Alexander and let him have his way.
  • Rani Karnawati and Emperor Humayun
    One of the most popular tales that come to our minds when we think of Rakhi is that of Rani Karnawati and Emperor Humayun. This dates back to the medieval era when Rajputs were fighting Muslim invasions. When Rani Karnawati, the widowed queen of the king of Chittor realised that she could not defend the invasion by the Sultan of Gujarat, Bahadur Shah, she sent a Rakhi to Emperor Humayun. The Emperor, touched by this gesture of sisterly love immediately set off with his troops to defend Chittor’s honour.
  • Lord Krishna and Draupadi
    Legend goes that during the war that Krishna fought and won against the evil King sari wherein he killed sari, Krishna was hurt and and his hand was bleeding. Seeing this, Draupadi tore a strip of cloth from her sari and tied it around his wrist. Lord Krishna, seeing her affections and realising her concerns about him, declared himself bounded by her sisterly love. He also promised that he will be at her side whenever she needed a brother. Many years later, when Pandavas lost Draupadi in a game of dice and Kauravas were removing her sari, Krishna helped her. He did so by continuously adding to the length of her sari and thereby saved her from a public disgrace.
  • King Bali and Goddess Lakshmi
    Mahabali, the demon king was also a great devotee of Lord Vishnu. It was thus that Lord Vishnu, left Vaikuntham, his dwelling to protect Bali’s kingdom. But, Goddess Lakshmi (Lord Vishnu’s wife) became sad because of the Lord having left her alone. So, she went to Bali as a Brahmin woman and took refuge as in the King’s palace. On Shravana Purnima, she tied a Rakhi on King Bali’s wrist. She then revealed her true identity and told the King of her real reason for coming. The king was touched by Her and Lord Vishnu’s good will and affection towards him and his family. Following which Bali requested Lord Vishnu to accompany her to Vaikuntham. It was thus that the festival of Rakhi also came to be known as Baleva (as a reference to Bali’s devotion to Lord Vishnu).

HAVE A HAPPY RAKSHA BANDHAN FRIENDS 🙂

Content courtesy: http://www.raksha-bandhan.com

Image courtesy: http://www.google.com

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63rd Republic Day of India 2012

Happy Republic Day wishes to all Indians from atinytoes!

Republic Day, celebrated on January 26th every year, is one of India’s most important national events. It was on January 26th, 1950 that the constitution of India came into force and India became a truly Sovereign, Democratic and Republic state.

On this day India finally enjoyed the freedom of spirit, rule of law and fundamental principle of governance. The patriotic fervor of the Indian people on this day brings the whole country together even in her embedded diversity.

Republic Day is a people’s day in a variety of ways:

It’s when regional identity takes a backseat and what matters most is the universal appeal of unity andbrotherhood projected by all Indians.

The Indian constitution basically stands for the aspirations which ‘the common man of India’ cherishes.

Republic Day is a day of the citizen of the country when he is entitled to be ‘all supreme’.

Republic Day is celebrated most majestically in the capital, New Delhi, where symbols of the great nation’smilitary might and cultural wealth are displayed in what is the world’s most impressive parade. All Government buildings are illuminated lending the city the atmosphere of a fairyland. This day is celebrated with much zeal and pride all across the nation.

Pongal – The Festival Celebrating Prosperity

India is a land whose primary occupation is agriculture. Changes in season thus play a very important role for Indian farmers. Their lifestyles and celebrations are thus exclusively linked to the seasonal landmarks in an year. There are many Indian festivals which are in tune with a farmers lifestyle and also with the seasonal variations in an year. Pongal, the harvest festival of the southern Indian state of Tamil Nadu is one of them.

When is Pongal Celebrated?
This festival marks the beginning of the end of winter season and corresponds to the time when the sun is moving towards Uttarayanam (north) from Dakshinayanam (south). The period is referred to as Uttarayan Punyakalam and is considered auspicious. As per the Tamil calender, Pongal is celebrated four days from the last day of the month of Margazhi (December — January) to the third day of the month Thai (January — February). Thus, according to the Gregorian calender, Pongal is celebrated from 12 to 15 January of which Pongal day or the first day of Thai falls on 14 January.

Common Traditions and Customs
Some of the rituals which are a must on Pongal are cleaning the house and wearing new clothes. The young girls and women wear a lehanga and half sari respectively whereas the men are attired in lungi and angavastram on this occasion. During the Pongal season, people eat sugar canes and decorate the houses with kolam which is made using rice paste. Kolams are generally made of white colour but one may also come across kolams made up of different colours.

Another popular custom is exchanging gifts on Pongal. In villages, farm labourers get ‘Pongal Padi’ or ‘Pongal Parisu’ as Pongal Gifts. This tradition has now moved on to other occupations as well, with employers giving gifts to their employees on the occasion of Pongal. This is an opportunity to present gifts to those among your family and friends as well. Some popular yet appropriate gift ideas on Pongal include Lord sun sculptures (on Surya Pongal), decoratives (on Bhogi Pongal), new kitchen vessels, wooden handicrafts and household goods.

The Festivities
Pongal is a festival that goes on for four days. The first day of festivities is known as the Bogi Pongal, wherein people worship the sun god and earth. The dish Pongal is made by boiling rice with milk. In fact the first paddy that is harvested is used to make Pongal. The second day is Surya Pongal or Perum Pongal. It is the most important day and people worship Surya, the Sun God and his consorts, Chaya and Samgnya. Old articles are thrown in the fire and people have an oil massage and wear new clothes on this day. On the third day of the festival, known as Mattu Pongal, the farm animals like cattles are worshipped. Cattles are bathed and dressed beautifully and served Pongal. The fourth day is Thiruvalluvar day or Kaanum Pongal. People visit family, friends and relatives, women of the house perform puja for the prosperity of their brothers. Many people leave cooked rice on banana leaves for birds on this day.

The Tamil Festival
On this occasion farmers pay their respects to the rain, sun and the farm animals, all of which are essentials in any harvest. Also, since paddy and other crops depend on the availability of good rain and Tamil Nadu does not have many perennial water sources, rain and sun gods are invoked during this auspicious occasion. Pongal is also known as “Tamizhar Thirunal” (meaning “the festival of Tamils”). “Thai Pirandhal Vazhi Pirakkum” which means that “birth of the Thai month will pave way for new opportunities” is a common saying in reference to Pongal.

http://www.pongalfestival.org/pongal-festival-celebrating.html

The things happened in the last part of 2011

Its the birthday post of the cute little Shyam who lives in my next-door. He turns 5 on December 16th 2011. It was a kids party though filled with kids from my apartment including me 😛 And here goes the pictures of the birthday bash!!!

 

 

Then the second was my cousin sister’s  marriage event which was a memorable one as i had one of my best 2 days of life with all my cousin sisters chatting playing pranks and all sort of girly things 😀 Thanks to all you guys who made those days a memorable one 🙂

A Christmas dinner with my sisters was a splendid moment which i can never forget. Each time i move out with my sisters i love the whole time spent with them 🙂 What i loved this time the more was the new restaurant and its settings which was quiet like a village effect 🙂 Good try guys 🙂 But need to concentrate more on the details of the restaurant to make it a perfect village effect 🙂

Thus my 2011 ended with heaps of joy and cheer!!!

Thus was the beginning of my 2012… It begun with a layered hair cut which i was eagerly waiting for a year and finally got it done in 2012 🙂 And purchase of Jewels was another joy 😀

Hoping for this whole year to be like this with lots of cheer and happiness for me and all you guys 🙂